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Three by Hopkins III

Three poems by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

The Lantern Out of Doors

Sometimes a lantern moves along the night.
   That interests our eyes. And who goes there?
   I think; where from and bound, I wonder, where,
With, all down darkness wide, his wading light?

Men go by me whom either beauty bright
   In mould or mind or what not else makes rare:
   They rain against our much-thick and marsh air
Rich beams, till death or distance buys them quite.

Death or distance soon consumes them: wind
   What most I may eye after, be in at the end
I cannot, and out of sight is out of mind.

Christ minds: Christ’s interest, what to avow or amend
   There, éyes them, heart wánts, care haúnts, foot fóllows kínd,
Their ránsom, théir rescue, ánd first, fást, last friénd.

(Poems 1876-89)

The Candle Indoors

Some candle clear burns somewhere I come by.
I muse at how its being puts blissful back
With yellowy moisture mild night's blear-all black,
Or to-fro tender trambeams truckle at the eye.

By that window what task what fingers ply,
I plod wondering, a-wanting, just for lack
Of answer the eagerer a-wanting Jessy or Jack
There God to aggrándise, God to glorify.—

Come you indoors, come home; your fading fire
Mend first and vital candle in close heart's vault:
You there are master, do your own desire;

What hinders? Are you beam-blind, yet to a fault
In a neighbour deft-handed? Are you that liar
And, cast by conscience out, spendsavour salt?

(Poems 1876-89)

As kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies dráw fláme;
   As tumbled over rim in roundy wells
   Stones ring; like each tucked string tells, each hung bell's
Bow swung finds tongue to fling out broad its name;
Each mortal thing does one thing and the same:
   Deals out that being indoors each one dwells;
   Selves—goes itself; myself it speaks and spells,
Crying Whát I do is me: for that I came.

Í say more: the just man justices;
   Kéeps gráce: thát keeps all his goings graces;
Acts in God's eye what in God's eye he is—
   Chríst—for Christ plays in ten thousand places,
Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his
   To the Father through the features of men's faces.

(Poems 1876-89)

The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins (fourth edition), ed. W.H. Gardner & N.H. MacKenzie, ## 40, 46, 57; pp. 71, 81, 90.

See also Three by Hopkins II: Three sonnets by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

Lane Core Jr. CIW P — Sun. 05/22/05 08:46:06 AM
Categorized as Literary & Religious & Sunday Poetry Series.

   
         
         

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